Discussion Boards for Paco 500

Contents

Discussion Board 1. 3

  1. What does it mean to “Possess My Soul through Self-Care and Mentorship?”. 3

Self-care. 3

Mentorship. 3

  1. What is the overarching purpose of “Possessing My Soul?”. 4
  2. What are the current self-care/resiliency themes being discussed in the readings and literature? 4
  3. How does one identify, solicit, and engage mentorship?. 4
  4. What self-care and mentorship strategy best fits your current soul-care context?. 5

Discussion Board 2. 6

Rationale for Solution Based Short-Term Strategy. 6

Brief Description of Solution-Based Short-Term Pastoral Counseling. 6

Key components of the pastoral counseling process. 7

The nine guiding assumptions of the pastoral counseling construct 7

  1. God is already active in the counselee. 7
  2. Complex problems do not demand complex solutions. 7
  3. Finding Exceptions Helps Create Solutions: 7
  4. The counselee is always changing: 7
  5. The counselee is the expert and defines the goals: 8
  6. Solutions are co-created. 8
  7. The Counselee is not the problem: The problem is. 8
  8. The counseling relationship is positional: 8
  9. If it is not broken, do not fix it: 8

The three tenets that help a counselor stay focused on the solution rather than the problem are: 8

Use of  SBSPC and demonstrating fit 8

The four phases associated with SFBT. 9

Phase One. 9

Phase Two (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 2) 9

Phase Three: (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 3) 10

Phase Four (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 4: Final Project) 10

Discussion Board 3. 11

Identify and describe Phase One distinctives: 12

The distinctives are: Purpose, Goal, Chief Aim, Role and responsibility. 12

Purpose: 12

Goal: 12

Chief aim; 12

Role/Responsibility: 12

Briefly discuss how you will align your DISC relational style to match the care seeker’s style. 12

The care seeker for this post is Bruce Murakami (Rice, 2015, p. 2). 13

What insights and/or techniques will resource these challenges?. 13

Identify a marker that indicates you have been invited into the care seeker’s story. 13

Bruce’s response to the miracle question, 13

Care seeker’s Behavioral Position. 13

What portrait, definition, key thoughts, and/or assessment insight do you need to consider during the supportive feedback?. 13

Portrait 14

Assessment Insight 14

After reviewing intake information and getting care seeker’s present story, how will you know whether or not a referral is needed?. 14

Discussion Board 4. 15

Phase Two distinctives:  According to Hawkins (2015) The Phase 2 distinctives are. 15

Purpose: 15

Goal: 15

Chief Aim: 15

Role/Responsibility: 15

Guiding Assumption: 15

Key Insight to Remember: 16

Identify and describe a marker that indicates you have collaboratively “imagineered” a picture of life without the problem. 16

During the supportive feedback break. 16

Definition(s) & Key thoughts: 17

Assessment insight: 17

Wise counsel: 17

Discussion Board 5. 18

In the event relapse, resistance, and/or sameness is encountered, identify and describe techniques beneficial to action plan’s timely execution. 22

 

 

Discussion Board 1

  1. What does it mean to “Possess My Soul through Self-Care and Mentorship?”
  2. What is the overarching purpose of “Possessing My Soul?”
  3. What are the current self-care/resiliency themes being discussed in the readings and literature?
  4. How does one identify, solicit, and engage mentorship?
  5. What self-care and mentorship strategy best fits your current soul-care context?

 

Response:

a.       What does it mean to “Possess My Soul through Self-Care and Mentorship?”

 

Self-care

Self-care is the process of establishing routines, coping mechanisms, deploying the spiritual disciplines of prayer, Bible study, solitude, silence, chastity, and meditation, as well as procedures that ensure that your mind, body, and spirit are healthy(Donahue, 1996, pp. 51-52; McMinn, M. R., Lish, R. A., Trice, P. D., Root, A. M., Gilbert, N., & Yap, A,., 2010: (Staley, McMinn, Gathercoal, & Free, 2012). Spiritual transformation occurs in our souls as we utilize these disciplines (Baker, 1998, pp. 139-140). According to Rikli, (2010), the process of feeding her spirit through the spiritual disciplines, and taking care of her body through eating correctly and exercising is another resource that demonstrates self-care. Taking care of one’s self is essential to spiritual and physical stability. Avoiding burn out is facilitated by self-care (Wilson & Hoffman, n.d., What is Shepherd’s care?). The Lord left us that example when he left the crowds for periods of solitude and prayer; as well as mentorship through his discussions with His Heavenly Father were “spirit and life to Him” John 6:63 KJV).

Mentorship

Mentorship is a construct of holding someone accountable for their lifestyle and spiritual processes but is also the vehicle through which encouragement, modeling of the spiritual disciples of the Christian life and opportunities to be heard and healed while enduring life’s battles occur (“Mentoring,” 2007, para. 2). Mentoring is an essential part of the self-care process.

b.      What is the overarching purpose of “Possessing My Soul?”

  1. Matthew Henry (2014) declared that Christians must be diligent to maintain their personal decorum, sustain mental health, and spiritual health (Henry, 2014 “Luke 21:19 commentary,”). Furthermore, Henry (2014) asserts that maintaining one’s composure is possessing one’s soul. According to the Geneva Study Bible, possessing one’s soul is an outward demonstration of self-control or the ability to control your temper (“Luke 21:19 Commentary Geneva Study Bible,” 2014). Carbonell (2008) affirms both Henry (2014) and the Geneva Study Bible’s assertion that the ability to control your temper is an outward manifestation of an individual’s ability to exercise self-control (p. 199). Therefore, one purpose of possession one’s soul is to demonstrate the spiritual gift of self-control, forbearance, and gentleness (Gal 5:22-24 NIV). Pastors work with people on a daily basis, and these gifts will enhance communication became they will be able to listen more intently with a temperate spirit (Petersen, 2007).
  2. A second purpose of possessing one’s soul is it is an essential skill when solving people puzzles. This is especially true if the pastor is a “D” type personality because “Ds” tend to become angry when they are not being heard. Developing the ability to control your temper/anger defines you as a child of God and shows your spiritual maturity of being angry without committing a sin (Eph 4:26 NLT).

c.       What are the current self-care/resiliency themes being discussed in the readings and literature?

 

McMinn, M. R., Lish, R. A., Trice, P. D., Root, A. M., Gilbert, N., & Yap, A,., (2010) Posit that the current themes for self-care and resiliency are relational in nature, “ intrapersonal, family, and community”(p. 570). According to Proeschold-Bell, Yang, Toth, Rivers, & Carder (2013), resiliency is defined as a measure of the presence of God in ministry and the daily life of a pastor (p. 878). Ellison, Roalson, Guillory, Flannelly, & Marcum (2009) define self-care and resiliency as how proficiently a pastor handles the stressors in his/her life, (p. 300). This thought process correlates with understanding how to handle the stressors in one’s life and the trigger that may lead to emotional explosions that hamper self-care and resiliency; understanding your own DiSC personality type and that of others will empower pastors to take care of their emotional and spiritual well-being as well as the congregants (Carbonell, 2015). Meek, McMinn, Brower, & Burnett (2003 proposed that being intentional in self-care as it relates to the spiritual disciplines and fostering healthy relationship are all hallmarks of self-care and resiliency.

d.      How does one identify, solicit, and engage mentorship?

One identifies a mentor by ascertaining whether or not the person is growing in the spirit, trustworthy, honest, and vulnerable enough to take ownership of their mistakes (Krejcir, 2008, para. 1). Mentorship is engaged according to the needs of the mentee. (para. 1). Solicit the mentorship of an individual who understands the importance of remediation and individual intervention; a person who will launch an intervention for you – in love – as needed. Mentees must engage the services of a mentor who understands how to utilize the SFPC process in counseling (Krejcir, 2008, para. 1; Kollar, 1997).

e.        What self-care and mentorship strategy best fits your current soul-care context?

The self-care and mentorship strategy that best fits this writer is the SPFC model.  It speaks to the soul of the person as well as their emotional needs (Krejcir, 2008, para. 1; Kollar, 1997).The spiritual disciplines and a deep understanding of the disciplines will help Joyce to grow vertically with her Heavenly Father and horizontally with humanity (Rikli, 2010).The self-care strategy of being disciplined in monitoring what is eaten and physical activity is crucial to the maintenance of this writer’s physical health. Understanding her limitations based on her physical health and knowing when to stop engagement in activities that will impair her health is essential to longevity (Rikli, 2010).

 

References

Baker, H. (1998). Soul keeping; Ancient paths of spiritual direction. Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress.

Carbonell, M. (2015). What is the everything DiSC Profile? Retrieved August 31, 2015, from https://www.onlinediscprofile.com/what-is-the-disc-profile/

Donahue, B. (1996). Leading Life-Changing Small Groups. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. Google Books.

Ellison, C. G., Roalson, L. A., Guillory, J. M., Flannelly, K. J., & Marcum, J. P. (2009). Religious resources, spiritual struggles, and Mental Health in a nationwide sample of PCUSA clergy. Pastoral Psychology, 59(3), 287-304.

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=TCDMGVY3vw0C&pg=GBS.PP1

Krejcir, R. J. (2008). What to look for in a mentor. Retrieved from http://www.discipleshiptools.org/apps/articles/default.asp?articleid=42629&columnid=4216

McMinn, M. R., Lish, R. A., Trice, P. D., Root, A. M., Gilbert, N., & Yap, A. (2005). Care For Pastors: Learning From Clergy and Their Spouses. Pastoral Psychology, 53(6), 563-581.

McMinn, M. R., Brower, C. M., & Burnett, T. D. (2003). Maintaining personal resiliency: Lessons learned from evangelical protestant clergy. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 31(4), 339-347. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/223672186?accountid=12085

Mentoring. (2007). Retrieved from http://www.discipleshiptools.org/pages.asp?pageid=64822

Petersen, J. (2007). Why don’t we listen better? Communicating & connecting in relationships. Lincoln City: Petersen Publications. [Google Books Version].

Proeschold-Bell, R. J., Yang, C., Toth, M., Rivers, M. C., & Carder, K. (2013). Closeness to God among those doing God’s work: A spiritual well-being measure for clergy [Abstract]. Journal of Religion and Health, 53(3), 878-894.

Rikli, M. (2010, Summer). Soul care [PDF]. Valley Forge: The Ministers Council.

Staley, R. C., McMinn, M. R., Gathercoal, K., & Free, K. (2013). Strategies employed by clergy to prevent and cope with interpersonal isolation. Pastoral Psychology, 62(6), 843-857.

Wilson, M., & Hoffman, B. (n.d.). Shepherd Care: Preventing ministry failure by supporting ministers. Retrieved from http://www.shepherd-care.org/

Discussion Board 2

Briefly outline and describe the essential elements of a solution-based, short-term pastoral counseling strategy such as its goal-orientation; brief (i.e., number of sessions) and time-limited (i.e., length of each session) nature; basic tenets and guiding assumptions (briefly explain each tenet and assumption), essential interpersonal skills, and possible behavioral positions (i.e., attending, blaming, willing).

Each phase and its corresponding distinctives should be clearly delineated: purpose, goal, chief aim, roles-responsibilities, and guiding assumptions.

What will you need to do in order to provide a physical setting and corresponding resources that might cultivate a safe and secure helping relationship?

Rationale for Solution Based Short-Term Strategy

The symbiotic relationship between the uniqueness of the care-seeker and the present problem presents a solution to the care-seekers counseling needs.

Brief Description of Solution-Based Short-Term Pastoral Counseling

The Solution-Based, Short-Term Pastoral Counseling (SBSPC) strategy considers the client to be more important than the problem; but recognition of the problem form of the problem leads to a conceived resolution (Hawkins, 2015).   SBSPC ensures that clients are empowered to focus their energies and direction on their self-care; the care-seeker is focused on God’s purpose for their life while addressing the issues and problems that they are presently facing (Jeremiah 29:11; Hawkins, 2015, para 2).  According to Hawkins 2015, the process is a short-term one. The SBSPC process is considered short-term because pastors recognize the boundaries within which they operate while providing this self-care service (Hawkins, 2015, “Terms”: para, 2). Consequently, the purposefulness of the sessions is measured by their brevity, are deliberately time-limited and structured with a focus on the number and length of sessions (Hawkins, 2015, “Terms”: para, 3). This process is bolstered by the use of the specific phases with the qualifying distinctives (Hawkins, 2015, “Terms”: para, 3). Although this strategy is solution-based, it differs from Kollar (2011) because it proposes that the person should be considered as the holder of the solution to the present problem  (Hawkins, 2015, “Terms”: para, 2).

Key components of the pastoral counseling process

As discussed by Hawkins (2015), the SBSPC process contains a fluidly embodied in the essential counseling sessions known as “distinctives” (para. 2).

The distinctives are

1) purpose,

2) goal

3) chief aim,

4) responsibility/role and

5) guiding assumptions (Hawkins, 2015, “Structure,” para. 2).

Hawkins (2011) continued his discourse by explaining that the distinctives are embedded in each of the four phases of SBSPC (“Structure,” para. 2). Hawkins (2011) defined the short-term process of SBSPC as: “brief-session should be limited to, 50, 60, 90 minutes, time-limited, and focused meaning the counselor and counselee choose how many sessions and how long they will counsel (“Structure,” para. 3).

The nine guiding assumptions of the pastoral counseling construct

1. God is already active in the counselee.

  1. Pastoral counseling sessions biblical worldview states that God is already working out a solution for the counselee’s life (Phil 1:6 ESV).

2. Complex problems do not demand complex solutions.

From the Christian worldview construct the Holy Spirit is already at work in the individual’s life to resolve the present problem.  Therefore, the counselor deploys listening carefully, using the appropriate body language, and asking the appropriate MECSTAT questions to aid the counselee to arrive at a solution.  (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001; Davies, 2011; Grohol, 2013). The solution is one that speaks to a complex problem, but unlike traditional therapy, it does not take months or years to arrive at the solution (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001; Davies, 2011; Grohol, 2013).

3. Finding Exceptions Helps Create Solutions:

As the counseling session ensues exceptions to the perceived problems are presented powered by guidance from the Word of God (Ecclesiastes 3:1; (Visser, 2011).

4.   The counselee is always changing:

The Biblical viewpoint is, “Grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Pet 3:18 KJV).  As growth occurs in the counselee, he/she changes. According to Grohol (2013), one of the most important things that bring about change is the ability to listen actively and respond to the counselor/pastor while he or she is engaged in the SFT process]. The counselee is in charge of how far and how fast they grow.

5. The counselee is the expert and defines the goals:

The counselee is the expert on the problem; therefore, the counselor facilitates the process of problem resolution as they move through the phases of SBSPC.  They determine how long the sessions will be and how many times they will need to meet with the counselor (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001)

6. Solutions are co-created.

During this process, a symbiotic relationship of co-creation is developed between the counselor and the counselee.  Together they develop a worldview where positive personal change is attainable.  Daily experiences of positive interactions are the focus of the counseling sessions.  The counselee visualizes the growth in themselves and sees the solution of the problem as a reality.

7. The Counselee is not the problem: The problem is.

Unlike psychopathology, the SBSPC counselor is not labeling the counselee as the problem. Knowing extensive information about the problem is not necessary for change to begin in the counselee (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, Assumptions of therapy, p. 2291)  Noting scenarios that clearly identify positive outcomes empower the counselee to see a solution for the problem and to isolate themselves from the problem; God loves us regardless of our challenges (Romans 5:8 ESV:)

8. The counseling relationship is positional:

The counselor positions the counselee to focus on a personal goal; this enables the counselee to develop a crystal vision of a solution; they can use the miracle dream process to facilitate this position.

9.  If it is not broken, do not fix it:

Focus on what is working.  Channel the counselee’s efforts on the things that are working to arrive at a solution for the problem  (Kollar, 2011, pp. 130-134).

         The three tenets that help a counselor stay focused on the solution rather than the problem are:

 

      • Tenet one: “If it’s not broken, don’t fix it!”
      • Tenet two: “Once you know what works, do more of it!”
      • Tenet three: “If it’s not working, do something different!” (p. 133).

 

Use of  SBSPC and demonstrating fit

 

As a counselor, the writer agrees with the simplicity and brevity of the tenets.  They are pointers in the counseling process that guides counseling sessions and facilitates the SBSPC process.  A friend came over to see the writer to discuss a broken relationship with a longtime friend.  As she talked the strategies of listening, questioning, confirming that she had indeed identified the problem, and was already working on a solution for the problem was evident (Kollar 2007).  Demonstrating fit was not as hard as the writer envisioned with a face-to-face person; her body language was comfortable and her eye-to-eye contact conveyed that we were freely talking about her concerns without fear or reservation (Kollar, 2007).  The writer was shocked to hear herself asking the miracle question to her friends of thirty years (Howard, 2015). The writer was also delighted to see the tension leave her friend’s face when she realized that she had already identified the problem and was actually describing a solution that she had used in two other scenarios.  The writer’s friend is highly educated and has much training in how to work with patients and individuals who are experiencing duress.  Therefore, the writer proceeds to notify her friend that the strategy that she was using appears to be working so, “If it is not broken, don’t fix” (Kollar, 2007).  She also affirmed for her friend that because she “knows what works [she] should do more of it”  (Kollar, 2007).  The session lasted for more than 60 minutes.  The writer will not see her friend until she drives back to visit her child.  However, an invitation to chat on Facebook, or utilize Facetime for more sessions was suggested and accepted.  The writer knows that embracing these strategies and taking ownership of them will make supporting individuals who are under stress much easier.

Intentionally listening to another person without analyzing what they are saying and engaging in “passive listening” is a trait of INFJs (Kollar, 2007;”Functional analysis of the INFJ,” 2015).  The writer is also aware that practicing these strategies will take time, but it is a worthwhile pursuit because she counsels people daily, and wants the Holy Spirit to be her guide while she is demonstrating the love of Christ to others (Hawkins, 2015).

The four phases associated with SFBT

 

            Hawkins (2015) asserts that the four phases of SFBT require no more than four counseling sessions.  The phases are: 

Phase One

Purpose: In session one: The care-seek is encouraged to present Story One)

Goal: the problem it describes.

The counselor’s chief aim: Listen Well

Role/responsibility: The counselor builds rapport/demonstrates fi with the counselee. As an INFJ compassionately listening to the counselee as he/she talks, especially is the counselee is an ESFP will give the person an opportunity to express themselves, Counselee talks and reveals the problem while the counselor actively listens.

Guiding Assumption(s): “God is already active in the counselee” (Kollar, 2011, p. 62–67); “The counseling relationship is positional” (p. 93).

Key Insight to Remember: Movement from phase one is initiated by an invitation by the counselee into their current worldview(Hawkins, 2015, para. 1)

 

Phase Two (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 2)

Purpose: Develop the Care-seekers Preferred Story/Solution (Session Two)

 Goal: Goal description/formulation

Chief Aim: Collaborate well [demonstrate fit while working with the counselee to develop a solution for the problem)

Role/responsibility: The counselor demonstrates fit; utilizes the appropriate questing techniques while the counselee sets the direction for problem-solving. The Counselor tacks with counselee’s process. But this occurs collaboratively. The testing of tests counselee’s notions of reality/do-ability cannot be determined by the counselor.

Guiding Assumption:  Even in this phase “The counselee is not the problem, the problem is (Kollar, 2011, pp. 77–80:(Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, Benefits and caveats, p. 2294). The pastoral counselor is reminded that the” counselee is the expert and defines goals” (Kollar, 2011, pp. 72–75); “Solutions are cocreated” (pp. 76–77). This is reminiscent of Jesus’ encounter with the Samaritan woman.  She talked and He listened to her story. When the resolution of the problem was established a goal was established and she declared to all that she knew who she was; the goal acknowledgment of sin and acceptance of the Messiah was reached (John 4:1-42).

Key Insight to Remember: Jesus used the “Miracle Question” with the Samaritan woman. Then she was able to move to the next phase. All three Tenets were used in His discussion with the Samaritan woman (Kollar, 2011, pp. 82–84).

 

Phase Three: (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 3)

Purpose: to clarify and Execute Action Plan (Session Three)

Goal: Vision (i.e., goal) Clarification: What is the goal for the counselee/ In the case of the Samaritan woman it was ‘go and sin no more’; and share Jesus with the rest of the town.(John 4:28-30

Chief Aim: Execute well

Role/Responsibility: Counselor builds rapport/demonstrates fi. The Counselor and Counselee actively participate in building hope and supporting forward progress. Using the Miracle question here will give the counselee a vision of their life without the problem

Guiding Assumption(s)? Always remember that, “Complex problems do not demand complex solutions; the goal of this phase is to encourage the counselee to visual that “finding exceptions helps [them] to create solutions” (Kollar, 2011, pp. 67–70; (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2271). Jesus made an exception when he went to Samaria; His disciples were not prepared to address the problem that existed between the Jews and Samaritans (John 4:27).

 

Phase Four (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 4: Final Project)

Purpose: Connect Care-seeker to Community (Session Four)

Goal: Consolidate and Support Change: the counselee takes ownership of the change that has occurred in them.

Chief Aim: Connect well: the counselor has established fit with the counselee and extends the support of the community of the body of Christ One of our guiding assumptions is that change is best supported and secured through the body of Christ (Kollar, p. 20).  Small groups will facilitate this process for the counselee, because it becomes part of the discipleship process for them (Earley & Dempsey, 2013, Never underestimate the power of the group: Location, 2607).

 

References 

Davies, N. (2011, August 25). Active listening through body language. Retrieved fromhttps://healthpsychologyconsultancy.wordpress.com/2011/08/25/active-listening-through-body-language/.

Earley, D., & Dempsey, R. (2013). Disciple making is . . . How to live the great commission with passion and confidence. Nashville, Tenn.: B & H Academics. [Kindle Edition].

Functional analysis Of the INFJ. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.humanmetrics.com/personality/infj

Greenberg, G., Ganshorn, K., & Danilkewich, A. (2001). Solution-focused therapy: Counseling model for busy family physicians. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/pmc/articles/PMC2018451/pdf/11768927.pdf

Grohol, J. M. (2013). Become a better listener: Active listening. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/become-a-better-listener-active-listening//

Hawkins, R. (2015). Overview of a solution-based short-term strategy [html]. Lecture presented at Week 4: PACO500_B01. Retrieved from https://learn.liberty.edu/bbcswebdav/courses/PACO500_B01_201540/

Hawkins, R. (2015, September 12). F.A.I.T.H for solution-based short-term pastoral counseling (SBSPC) [Document]. Reading presented at Liberty University PACO 500: BO1. Retrieved from https://learn.liberty.edu/blackboard

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=TCDMGVY3vw0C&pg=GBS.PP1

Visser, C. (2011). The progress-focused approach: 21 progress-focused techniques. Retrieved fromhttp://www.progressfocused.com/2011/07/21-solution-focused-techniques.html

 

Discussion Board 3

After reviewing the readings, and available presentations, lecture notes, articles, and/or web-engagements, identify and discuss essential elements and techniques for building rapport with a specific care seeker from our case study—Crossroads: A Story of Forgiveness (i.e., Bruce, Joshua, Brody, Justin, or Melissa).

  • Identify and describe Phase One distinctives: purpose, goal, chief aim, role/responsibility,
  • Briefly discuss how you will align your DISC relational style to match the care seekers Identify care seekers behavioral position (i.e., attending, blaming, or willing) and how this might influence relational alignment.
  • Discuss the challenges you might face in actively listening without judgment and in checking any advice giving tendencies or excessive self-disclosure. What will insights and/or techniques resource these challenges?
  • Identify and describe a marker that indicates you have been invited into the care seekers story?
  • After receiving the invitation to enter the care seekers world, what portrait, definition(s), key thought(s), and/or assessment insight do you need to consider during the supportive feedback break, before making a commitment to counseling (review Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 10)?

After reviewing intake information and getting the care seekers present story, how will you know whether or not a referral is needed? Though counseling will continue for the sake of this learning experience, choose at least one scenario from Johnson & Johnson (see corresponding Summary and Guidelines in chs. 2–5) to illustrate your role/responsibility in the event a referral is needed. The selected scenario does not have to align with this case study; its value is for assessing your understanding of a referral networking.

 

Identify and describe Phase One distinctives:

The distinctives are: Purpose, Goal, Chief Aim, Role and responsibility

Purpose:

During the purpose distinctive the counselor will get the care seekers present story – this normally happens during the first session of SFT.  This occurs when the counselor is listening and is listening attentively because it presents an opportunity to the questions that will clarify the counselee’s goal (Hawkins, 2015, para. 1; Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2290).  During this distinctive, the counselor is listening for possible strengths and even exceptions to the problem that the counselor is presenting to him/her (Kollar, 2011, p. 139).

Goal:

During the goal distinctive the care seeker describes the problem (Hawkins, 2015, para. 2).  The care-seeker develops a sense of being heard (Kollar, 2011, p. 140).

Chief aim;

The counselor listens and listens attentively to understand the problem, not find a solution (Hawkins, 2015, para. 2). Remember the guiding assumptions and the fact that “God is already active in the care-seeker, and the counseling relationship is positional” (Kollar, 2011, pp. 92-93).

Role/Responsibility:

The care-seeker speaks; the counselor listens, comprehends the care seekers DISC style, and demonstrates fit, genuine empathy while grasping an understanding of the care seeker’s life with the presenting problem (Hawkins, 2015, para. 2; Kollar, 2011, p. 145).  All of these skills and activities lead to the use of the MECSTAT process (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2291).  Phase one does not end until the care seeker has invited the counselor into their world, and they have committed to counseling (Hawkins, 2015, para. 4).   It would be appropriate to ask the miracle question at this juncture Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2291; Kollar, 2011, 164).

 

Briefly discuss how you will align your DISC relational style to match the care seeker’s style.

Identify care seeker’s behavioral position (i.e., attending, blaming, or willing) and how this might influence relational alignment.

The care seeker for this post is Bruce Murakami (Rice, 2015, p. 2).

Bruce’s relational style is “D/C” with “D” as the highest measure on the scale.  Bruce is results-oriented and he makes fast decisions; such as forgiving the killer of his wife and daughter and launching a campaign to teach to anyone who has experienced a similar life event without thought for what this campaign would do to his living children (“Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex than You Knew.,” 2012, High D; Carbonell, 2008, pp. 16-17). “Ds” are so focused that it makes them appear to be uncaring and disconnected from others; consequently Brody’s unconnected with Bruce (Carbonell, 2008, p. 17).  Bruce’s driving personality style created interpersonal communication challenges for him; he listens at a level 1 stage (Petersen, 2007, p. 18). However, because Bruce likes challenges he will consider ‘the problem’ to be something that he will want to solve and solve rapidly (Carbonell, 2008, p. 17). The writer’s DISC relational style is high C/S (Carbonell, 2008, p. 110).

What insights and/or techniques will resource these challenges?

With the strength of listening as part of the “S” DISC relational style, the writer will listen attentively to Bruce, who is willing to present his story.  With the knowledge that, “God is already active in the counselee” (Kollar, 2011, p. 60), and that “The counseling relationship is positional” (p. 93). The writer will demonstrate fit by being an empathic and engaged listener.

Identify a marker that indicates you have been invited into the care seeker’s story

 Bruce’s response to the miracle question,

“Imagine that, while you are sleeping tonight, a miracle happens. You wake up tomorrow, and you sense that you are on track toward making a decision. What will you be doing differently that will tell you that you are on track I your relationship with Brody?” will indicate that Bruce has invited the counselor into the care seeker’s story (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2291).  His indication that change is needed and that he is willing to make that change proffers an invitation.

After receiving the invitation to enter the care seeker’s world, what portrait, definition(s), key thought(s), and/or assessment insight do you need to consider during the supportive feedback break, before making a commitment to counsel

Care seeker’s Behavioral Position

Bruce has determined that he is losing his son Brody. He is seeking counsel to mend the broken relationship.

What portrait, definition, key thoughts, and/or assessment insight do you need to consider during the supportive feedback?

Bruce does not understand the relational disconnect that he is experiencing with his son.  He is not aware that it is not just a result of the sudden death.  He does not understand his son’s personality style.  Supportive feedback will include Bruce’s willingness to forgive and his insight of the fact that Brody is still grieving and feels as if he is losing his father too (Rice, 2015, p. 11).

Portrait

A “sudden death can be more difficult to grieve . . . . it often leads to feelings of abandonment” (Rice, 2015, p. 11).  Bruce is aware of this abandonment that his son is feeling, and he is not sure how to address it (Rice, 2015, p. 11).  To some degree, he feels responsible for it because he has not been there for him, and even after his mother’s death, the forgiveness mission excluded Brody (Rice, 2015, pp. 10-11).

Assessment Insight

Bruce has been so involved with his mission of forgiveness that he has missed Brody’s fear of losing his father.

After reviewing intake information and getting care seeker’s present story, how will you know whether or not a referral is needed?

The counselor will ascertain the nature, intensity, and possibility of imminent danger to either the care seeker or the care seeker’s child, if the interpersonal disconnect continues (Johnson & Johnson, 2014, Ministerial triage and the art of referral, para. 4; Clinton & Hawkins, 2009). This scenario will determine the urgency of the need for referral to an MHT (para. 5).

References

Carbonell, M. (2008). How to solve the people puzzle: Understanding personality patterns. BlueRidge, GA: Uniquely You Resources.

Clinton, T., & Hawkins, R. (2009). The quick-reference guide to biblical counseling. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Publishing Group. [Google Books Edition].

Good listening: Listen up! It’s more complex than you knew. (2012, July 6). Retrieved from http://datadome.com/newsblog/tag/disc-behavior/

Greenberg, G., Ganshorn, K., & Danilkewich, A. (2001). Solution-focused therapy: Counseling model for busy family physicians. PsycEXTRA Dataset, 27(November), 2289-2295. doi:10.1037/e537562004-001

Hawkins, R. (2015). Finding additional information that helps for session one phase one [html]. Lecture presented at Week 5: PACO500_B01. Retrieved from https://learn.liberty.edu/blackboard.

Johnson, W. B., & Johnson, W. L. (2014). The minister’s guide to psychological disorders and treatments. (2nd ed.).  New York, NY: Routledge – Taylor & Francis Group.

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=TCDMGVY3vw0C&pg=GBS.PP1

Petersen, J. (2007). Why don’t we listen better? Communicating & connecting in relationships. Tigard, Washington. Kindle.

Rice, D. C. (2015). Case study [Doc]. Lecture presented at PACO 500 introduction to pastoral counseling. Retrieved from Liberty University https://learn.liberty.edu/

Discussion Board 4

Phase Two distinctives:  According to Hawkins (2015) The Phase 2 distinctives are

Purpose: 

Develop the Care seekers Preferred Story/Solution (Session Two)

Goal: 

Goal description/formulation

Chief Aim: 

The chief aim of this phase is positive, collaborate, engagement and working well with the care seeker as the counselor demonstrates fit (Hawkins, 2015, para. 2). These procedures guide the care seeker to develop a solution for the problem and build the framework need for the change process to begin (Kollar, 2011, pp. 136-138).

Role/Responsibility: 

The counselor demonstrates fit; utilizes the appropriate questioning techniques while the care seeker sets the direction for problem-solving (Hawkins, 2015, para. 3).   The counselor recognizes that the care seeker is a competent individual who came to the interview seeking a solution to their problem; with that in mind the counselor should treat them with the same respect, care and compassion that they would want to be treated (Matthew 7:12; Kollar, 2011, pp. 136).  The use of exception questions clarify for the care seeker where they are in their journey; it also reveals the care seekers resources and the fact that they have ownership of the problem because they have achieved success (Greenberg & Ganshorn, 2003, p. 2).  According to Kollar (2011), the counselor tracks with care seeker’s progress as they follow the listening, questions, clarification, and provide feedback protocol detail in Figure 8.1. (p. 138). But this occurs collaboratively.  The care-seeker is not ready for phase three if they are still in a “blaming” position.  However, Bruce is willing to find a solution to his problem.

Guiding Assumption:

As in Phase One,

  • “The care seeker is not the problem, the problem is (Kollar, 2011, pp. 77–80: (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, Benefits and caveats, p. 2294).
  • The pastoral counselor knows that the” care seeker is the expert and defines the goals” (Kollar, 2011, pp. 72–75).  According to Kollar (2011), the listening process is a symbiotic one.  The counselor listens attentively; the care seeker is aware that they are being heard (p. 140).
  • “Solutions are cocreated” (pp. 76–77). The Lord used this same strategy with people whom he encountered; the lepers (Luke 17:17), the disciples (Matthew 16:13-20), The rich man who wanted to follow him (Matthew 19:16-30).  Questioning reveals the heart of a person and solutions or resolutions occur after clarification is made.

Key Insight to Remember: 

Use MECSTAT where appropriate (Greenberg & Ganshorn 2003, Questions in SFT, p. 1). All three tenets are deployed throughout the counseling session (Kollar, 2011, pp. 82–84).

The care seeker for this post is Bruce Murakami, who is a willing care seeker (Rice, 2015, p. 2).

Bruce’s relational style is “D/C” with “D” as the highest measure on the scale.  Bruce is results-oriented, and he makes fast decisions. “Good.Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).  It is very likely that he will expect to arrive at a solution to the problem in session two, so he can go on to his next challenge (Carbonell, 2008, pp. 16). “Ds” are poor listeners; however, their relational style places them in a problem-solving mode: this is an excellent point for counseling (“Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).

According to Datadome, to maintain Bruce’s focus, lengthy questions will not demonstrate fit; therefore, present questions in a bulleted format. “Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).  This strategy guarantees that the core conditions for listening are established and maintained based on Bruce’s personality style (Kollar, 2011). Congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathy must be experienced by Bruce for fit to become a reality for him and the counselor (p. 224).

To ensure that Bruce maintains his focus on the solution to the problem and not rushing to a resolution, reiterate the miracle question (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 2, para. 4). The counselor is demonstrating fit by collaborating with the care seeker and utilizing her strengths of listening, and compassion.  Use the exception question to keep Bruce focused, because he needs to learn how to verbalize rather than assume conclusions (Carbonell, 2008, p. 17).  Clarifying questions will ease and expand his thoughts (Kollar, 2011, 138). However, because Bruce likes challenges, he will consider ‘the problem’ to be something that he will want to solve and solve rapidly (Carbonell, 2008, p. 17).   The supportive feedback break will give him an opportunity to think things through, and also facilitate an energy break for the counselor who is an INFJ.  Maintaining fit with someone who wants to be in control and forge ahead to the solution will be a challenge for the counselor.  Remembering the type of MECSTAT questions to ask and asking them in a way that fits Bruce’s DISC style will deploy collaborative portrait building and problem resolution process.

Identify and describe a marker that indicates you have collaboratively “imagineered” a picture of life without the problem.

Due to Bruce’s DISC style, paragraphed questions will lose his interest; subsequently, an appropriate miracle question for Bruce would be, “Pretend the problem is solved. What are you doing differently?” (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2291). Bruce is now ready to formulate a goal for the problem of being non-communicative and disconnected from his sons.

During the supportive feedback break

Portrait; The counselor will reflect on the interview sheet and the notes were taken on the problem as presented by the counselee.  Bruce gave a scenario that he has been so busy demonstrating the love of Christ, through the act of forgiveness, that he has come to realize that his driving personality has cost him the love and attention of his remaining family (Rice, 2015).

Definition(s) & Key thoughts:

Bruce’s disconnection from his family emote feelings of loss.

  • Disconnection: Work has been his focus.  He has relied on his wife to keep the home fires burning and meeting the needs of the children. (Rice, 2015) – Now he has a negative feeling of being disconnected from others (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p.10).
  • Transference of grief: Sometimes people experience grief by transferring that emotion into another activity (Ogbonna, 2014, p. 92).  Bruce used the tenets of the Bible to offer forgiveness to the person who murdered his family: he channeled all of the energy, and grief, into his mission of demonstrative forgiveness(Rice, 2015, p. 4).  However, he did not grieve the loss of his wife and daughter with his children. Now he is experiencing a perceive grief for the loss of the relationship he does not have with his living children, “Grief is intense emotional suffering caused by a loss.” (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 121).  In Bruce’s case, he is grieving the loss of a relationship with his sons.

Assessment insight:

Ascertain if Bruce is experiencing any emotional trauma that must be addressed by a professional by asking the following questions:

  • Are you depressed about the current problem? (If the answer is yes)
  • On the scale of one to ten, how would you rate your level of depression about the current problem? (Rule out question) The higher the rating on the scale the sign for a referral to an MHT is solidified (Johnson & Johnson, 2014)
  • Clarify who died and how the death affected the care seeker, as well as each of his living children.  It must be clear that Bruce’s perceptions of the situation are realistic and not a part of his grief (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 123).
  • I Peter 5:7 “Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.” comes to mind, at the same time, a person who is grieving does not want Scripture quoted to them.
  • Asking some of the assessment interview questions for grief and loss will solidify Bruce’s level of grief (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, pp 120-121).
  • Ask Bruce on a scale of one to ten where is his relationship with his sons. This response will present itself as an exception or part of the wise counsel.  He is possibly reaching out more than he realizes.

Wise counsel:

Intentional listening will be deployed during wise counsel to guide further the decision as to the need for a referral (Petersen, 2007).

  • Bruce’s feelings of guilt about his disconnect from his sons must be addressed.
  • Discuss that everyone grieves differently.
  • Discuss his perceptions of Brody’s grief, as perceived by Bruce
  • Discuss the level of Joshua’s grief, as observed by Bruce.
  • Address his current relationship with his sons.  Draw attention to the exceptions in the relationships that are contrary to his thought processes. Address the manner in which he addressed his grief.  Address his exceptional behavior towards the murderer of his wife and daughter.  That exception is a part of his personality.  He can extend that same degree of compassion to his sons as they are going through their grief. Ask Bruce if he has a circle of friends with whom he can talk about his feelings.

References

Carbonell, M. (2008). How to solve the people puzzle: Understanding personality patterns. BlueRidge, GA: Uniquely You Resources.

Clinton, T., & Hawkins, R. (2009). The quick-reference guide to biblical counseling: Kindle Edition. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Publishing Group.

Good listening: Listen up! It’s more complex than you knew. (2012, July 6). Retrieved from http://datadome.com/newsblog/tag/disc-behavior/

Greenberg, G., & Ganshorn, K. (2003). Solution-focused therapy: A solution driven model for change. Canadian Family Physician, 47, 1-3. Retrieved from https://learn.liberty.edu/blackboard

Greenberg, G., Ganshorn, K., & Danilkewich, A. (2001). Solution-focused therapy: Counseling model for busy family physicians. Gail Greenberg. PsycEXTRA Dataset,27(November), 2289-2295. doi:10.1037/e537562004-001

Hawkins, R. (2015). Finding additional information that helps for session two phase two [html]. Lecture presented at Week 6: PACO500_B01. Retrieved September 23, 2015, from https://learn.liberty.edu/blackboard

Johnson, W. B., & Johnson, W. L. (2014). The minister’s guide to psychological disorders and treatments. [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=owyLAwAAQBAJ

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=TCDMGVY3vw0C&pg=GBS.PP1

Ogbonna, E. O. (2014). Mastering the power of your emotions: How to Control What Happens In You Irrespective of what happens to you [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=4jIMBAAAQBAJ

Petersen, J. (2007). Why don’t we listen better? Communicating & Connecting in relationships[Kindle Edition]. Retrieved from Amazon.com.

Rice, D. C. (2015). Case study [Doc]. Lecture presented at PACO 500 introduction to pastoral counseling. Retrieved from Liberty University https://learn.liberty.edu/

 

Discussion Board 5

 

Chosen Care seeker Bruce (Rice, 2015)

Phase Three: (Hawkins, 2015, Phase 3)

Purpose: To clarify and Execute Action Plan

Goal: Vision (i.e., goal) Clarification: What is the goal for the counselee?  Bruce wants to connect with his sons emotionally. He has determined that he cannot do this alone.  He has ascertained that a plan of action would be to work on his relationship with Brody first. Then work on his relationship with Joshua who is in school. Then they will need to work together as a family to bring back the cohesion that existed when his wife and their mother was alive. Also, be mindful of God’s goal for Bruce’s life.  He is part of the formation of the resolution to Bruce’s problem (Kollar, 2011).  Using the MECSTAT questioning methodology reconnects Bruce’s to his dream, clarifies how he is coping now that he is in Phase 3 of the process  (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001).  Scaling questions will heighten the counselor’s knowledge of how well Bruce is progressing; they will also apprise Bruce of God’s work within his heart (Kollar, 2011, p. 393). Only Bruce can identify where he is in the process. He should be able to articulate how well he is coping with the problem and what progress he has accomplished since Phase One and Two.

 

Chief Aim: Execute the action plan with fidelity to aid Bruce in the resolution of his problem.  An action plan has been developed executing it will require the effective use of MECSTAT and reliance on the Holy Spirit to complete the work He has begun in Bruce ( Kollar, 2011; Phil 1:6). According to Howard, 2015, ” the idea of Phase Three is developing and maintaining forward progress. So, when you see that happening, secure and support responsible members, small group ministries.”.  This will prepare Bruce for Phase 4 if he is ready for it.

 

Role/Responsibility: Counselor builds rapport/demonstrates fit The Counselor and Counselee actively participate in building hope and support by moving forward.
 

Guiding Assumption(s)? Always remember that, “Complex problems do not demand complex solutions; the goal of this phase is to encourage the counselee to visual that “finding exceptions helps [them] to create solutions” (Kollar, 2011, pp. 67–70; (Greenberg, Ganshorn, & Danilkewich, 2001, p. 2271).

Briefly discuss how you will maintain rapport and DISC relational style alignment with care seeker’s current behavioral position (i.e., willing). & How to resolve any challenges that may arise. 

Bruce’s relational style is “D/C” with “D” as the highest measure on the scale.  Bruce is results-oriented, and he makes fast decisions. “Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).  It is very likely that he will expect to arrive at a solution to the problem in session two, so he can go on to his next challenge (Carbonell, 2008, pp. 16). “Ds” are poor listeners; however, their relational style places them in a problem-solving mode: this is an excellent point for counseling (“Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).

According to Datadome, to maintain Bruce’s focus, lengthy questions will not demonstrate fit; therefore, present questions in a bulleted format. “Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D).  This strategy guarantees that the core conditions for listening are established and maintained based on Bruce’s personality style (Kollar, 2011). Congruence, unconditional positive regard, and empathy must be experienced by Bruce for fit to become a reality for him and the counselor (p. 224). Utilizing the Talker Listener Card (TLC) will help Bruce to remain focused on the discussion points  (Petersen, 2007, p. 50).  Using the TLC will be a challenge for Bruce because he is a take charge and move forward personality type; consequently, when Bruce speaks first he is assuming his DISC personality style of “being in charge” and taking control of the situation   (“Good Listening: Listen Up! It’s More Complex Than You Knew,” 2012, High D). The TLC brings control to the situation and structures the session.  The TLC will structure the use of the MECSTAT process too.  The counselor will ask the appropriate questions when they have the “Talker” side of the card, and it forces Bruce to focus and listen. (Petersen, 2007).  Be mindful of the “thud” “Petersen, 2007).  Although it may be the counselor’s “turn” to speak, if the “thud” indicates that Bruce may need to continue his thoughts the counselor must allow Bruce to continue to speak (p. 68).

During the supportive feedback break

Portrait; The counselor will reflect on the interview sheet and the notes were taken on the problem as presented by the counselee.  Bruce gave a scenario that he has been so busy demonstrating the love of Christ, through the act of forgiveness, that he has come to realize that his driving personality has cost him the love and attention of his remaining family (Rice, 2015). Now Bruce is at a point where he is willing to deploy the action plan and move forward with reconciliation.

Definition(s) & Key thoughts:

Bruce’s disconnection from his family emote feelings of loss. His willingness to resolve the problem demonstrates that the Holy Spirit is working with him to be the father he wants to be to his children

  • Disconnection:  He has relied on his wife to keep the home fires burning and meeting the needs of the children (Rice, 2015).
  • Now he is at a point where he recognizes that the negative feeling of being disconnected from them can be resolved (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p.10).
  • Transference of grief: According to (Ogbonna, 2014) sometimes people transfer their grief to other activities. Bruce used the tenets of the Bible to offer forgiveness to the person who murdered his family: he channeled all of the energy, and grief, into his mission of demonstrative forgiveness (Rice, 2015, p. 4).
  • God’s will in the process of reconciliation: Does Bruce recognize that “God finishes what He has started?” (Warren, 2014).  God wants us to be reconciled with others (Matthew 18:15-16).
  • Decision making and the will of God.  Has Bruce arrived at a point in his action plan where he can engage in Family therapy with his children?

Assessment insight: Ascertain if Bruce has arrived at a point in his action plan where he can engage in Family therapy with his children?

  • Do you believe that it is God’s will for you to be reconciled with your sons? (If the answer is yes)
  • On the scale of one to ten do you think family therapy will aid in the reconciliation with your sons? How will it affect you already established action plan?  (Rule out question) The higher the rating on the scale the sign for a referral to a family therapist is solidified (Johnson & Johnson, 2014)
  • Clarify God’s intention for the family- Raise children by God’s standards (Eph. 6:4).  It must be clear that Bruce’s perceptions of the situation are realistic and not a part of his mission to demonstrate forgiveness (Rice, 2015; Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 58).
  • Ask “How might God direct you toward His will or plan in this decision to begin family therapy?” (p. 53).  Family therapy might appear to a quick solution to a problem that is on it’s way to being resolved.  Be mindful that Bruce is a type”D” personality.
  • Asking some of the assessment interview questions for decision making will solidify Bruce’s desire for reconciliation and maybe moving forward to family therapy-if that is what the family desires, not just Bruce. His problem involves them too  (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, pp 56-57).  Again his action plan is already working so “if it isn’t broken, don’t fix it (Kollar, 201).
  • Ask Bruce on a scale of one to ten where is his now – since counseling has begun- in the relationship with his sons. This response will present itself as an exception or part of the wise counsel.  He is possibly reaching out more than he realizes. In other words, the action plan is working.

Prayer Starter: This is an excellent prayer for Bruce: Dear Lord, thank You for the life of my dear wife and daughter. Our hearts are very heavy that they no longer here. Although this death may make no sense now, please bring sense from it, and glorify Yourself through it. Give us Your Holy Spirit as a Comforter in the minutes and hours and days to come and help us to understand each other’s needs at this time. Bring us closer together as a family and mend the broken hearted. (Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, pp. 55-56)

 

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES (as cited by Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 56)

Graham, Billy. Death and the Life After. Thomas Nelson, 1994.

Lynch, Thomas. The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade. Penguin, 1998.

Nouwen, Henri. Turn My Mourning into Dancing: Finding Hope in Hard Times. Thomas Nelson, 2004.

Veerman, Dave, and Bruce Barton. When Your Father Dies: How a Man Deals with the Loss of His Father. Thomas Nelson, 2006.

Zimmerman, Dennis. Healing Death: Finding Wholeness When a Cure Is No Longer Possible. Pilgrim Press, 2007.

Focus on the family.. (2002). Moving forward: Dealing with grief. Retrieved from http://www.focusonthefamily.com/lifechallenges/emotional-health/moving-forward-dealing-with-grief

 

Wise counsel  & Action steps: Intentional listening will be deployed during wise counsel to guide further the decision as to the need for a referral (Petersen, 2007). Action Steps

  • Bruce is a man of faith and action (James 2:14-18).
  • Because Bruce said yes to family therapy.
  • Begin the referral process.
  • Remind Bruce about the steps for referral and the consent form that he signed before counseling began
  • Discuss the need for God to enter the process of reconciliation (Matthew 18).
  • Discuss that when we have peace about a decision we know that it is from God (I Pet. 5:7; Clinton & Hawkins, 2009, p. 58).  Bruce is experiencing peace because he has determined that he and his family can move forward to the joint resolution of their problems.
  • Discuss his perceptions of Joshua’s Brody’s grief, as perceived by Bruce and also how family therapy will help him to resolve that problem in his life (if Bruce’s answer was yes to family therapy).
  • Address any exceptions in his current relationship with his sons.  Draw attention to the exceptions in the relationships that are contrary to his thought processes. Address his exceptional behavior towards the murderer of his wife and daughter (Rice, 2015). Bruce forgave the sin of Justin in the same manner that Christ forgave him of his sin  (Matthew 6:12).
  • Build a dream, “You wake up one day and realize that the energy that you placed in the forgiveness process after your wife had died was redirected to the reconciliation of your son the disconnection no longer exists.”  What does your relationship with your sons look like now Bruce? That question matches his personality
  • Complete the referral process.  Ensure Bruce that you are there for any questions that he and or his new therapist may have for you.

In the event relapse, resistance, and/or sameness is encountered, identify and describe techniques beneficial to action plan’s timely execution.

 

 

  • Relapses are caused by an individual’s emotions traveling back in time to a location in the brain (Kollar, 2011) Using the task concept number 8 in Kollar (2011), will help Bruce to come forward to his present level of reasoning and emotions, Bruce’s faith and belief in God’s hand in his life will help the counselor and counselee to resolve the relapse (Kollar, 2011, p. 397) .
  • Discussing how God has brought him to the place of counseling.
  • Re-establishing the miracle question and the purpose for choosing to counsel in the first place will be a mental jog for Bruce.
  • Re-stating Bruce’s responses to exceptions in his relationship with his son’s that he has recognized that he was already on his way to reconciliation (Kollar, 2011).
  • Sameness: When this occurs using the above strategies will also refresh Bruce’s desire to move forward with the resolution of the problem (Kollar, 2011).  It is not likely that sameness will last very long in an individual with Bruce’s DISC – Style.  Sameness is incongruous to their personality

 

References

Carbonell, M. (2008). How to solve the people puzzle: Understanding personality patterns [Google Book]. Retrieved from Amazon.com.

Clinton, T., & Hawkins, R. (2009). The quick-reference guide to biblical counseling: Kindle Edition. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Publishing Group.

Good listening: Listen up! It’s more complex than you knew. (2012, July 6). Retrieved from http://datadome.com/newsblog/tag/disc-behavior/

Greenberg, G., Ganshorn, K., & Danilkewich, A. (2001). Solution-focused therapy: Counseling model for busy family physicians. Gail Greenberg. PsycEXTRA Dataset, 27(November), 2289-2295. doi:10.1037/e537562004-001

Hawkins, R. (2015). Finding additional information that helps for session two phase two [html]. Lecture presented at Week 6: PACO500_B01. Retrieved September 23, 2015, from https://learn.liberty.edu/blackboard

Johnson, W. B., & Johnson, W. L. (2014). The minister’s guide to psychological disorders and treatments[Kindle edition] (2nd ed.). Retrieved from Amazon.com.

Justice, J. A., & Garland, D. R. (2010). Dual relationships in congregational Practice: Ethical Guidelines for Congregational social workers and pastors. Social Work & Christianity, 37(4), 437-445. doi:http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=55558046&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=TCDMGVY3vw0C&pg=GBS.PP1

Lynch, Thomas. The Undertaking: Life Studies from the Dismal Trade. Penguin, 1998.

Ogbonna, E. O. (2014). Mastering the power of your emotions: How to Control What Happens In You Irrespective of what happens to you [Google Books Version]. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=4jIMBAAAQBAJ

Petersen, J. (2007). Why don’t we listen better? Communicating & connecting in relationships[Kindle Edition]. Retrieved from Amazon.com.

Rice, D. C. (2015). Case study [Doc]. Lecture presented at PACO 500 introduction to pastoral counseling. Retrieved from Liberty University https://learn.liberty.edu/

Warren, R. (2014, May 21). God finishes what he starts. Retrieved from http://rickwarren.org/devotional/english/god-finishes-what-he-starts

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